Your Child's Education

educationhubChildren need support throughout all of the stages of their education, from preschool to grade school and beyond. If you decide to homeschool, you'll need extra tools and resources available to help you.

We've put together resources to help with all ages and stages in the education process. Learn what to expect at different math levels, how you can help your preschool child get ready to learn, how to decide if homeschool is right for you and more. Being a part of your child's education is a valuable gift both they and you will benefit from all through life.

 


Keys to Reading


List of Verbs

List of Pronouns

List of Prepositions

List of Nouns

List of Adverbs

List Of Adjectives

Rhyming Words

Raising Kids Who Love to Read

Reading Comprehension

Learn to Read

Guided Reading

 

Math & Science

 

First Grade Math

2nd Grade Math

3rd Grade Math

4th Grade Math

5th Grade Math

6th Grade Math

Multiplication Chart

Science Experiments

Science For Kids

Science Projects

 


Preschool & Kindergarten


Should Your Child Go to Preschool

What Preschoolers Should Learn

Learning Colors

Preschool Games

Alphabet Letters

Learning Numbers

Playdough Recipe

Preschool Activities

Preschool Lesson Plans

Overcoming Separation Anxiety

Prepare for Kindergarten

Kindergarten Curriculum Guide

 

Elementary Through College


Elementary Homework Help

Success in Middle School

Preparing for Middle School

Keeping Teens Organized

Teaching Teens Life Skills

The Facts About High School Hazing

When Your Child Leaves for College

Preparing Your Child for College

 


School Day Nutrition


Best Food for School

Picking A Healthy Cafeteria Lunch

School Day Breakfast Ideas

 


Tips for Sucessful School Years


From Night Owl to Early Bird

More Homework Tips

Strategies for School Success

Stop Struggling in School

Private vs Public School

Help Your Child Beat Test Anxiety

 

 

 

 

Multiplication Chart

Using a multiplication chart is a great way to learn multiplication of numbers. It's a handy reference that with continued use helps a child memorize their multiplication facts.

How to use the multiplication chart:

Step One - Choose a number from the left hand column of the chart (directly under the X)

Step Two - Choose the number you want to multiply your first number with from the row across the top of the chart (directly next to the X)

Step Three - Go along the row from the left hand column number, then go directly down the column from the top row number until both the column and the row meet at one square. That is your answer.

For example...if we chose the number 6 on the left hand column (it's in blue) and the number 7 on the top row (it's in green), we would go across the row from the 6 on the side while going down the column from the number 7 at the top. The box they meet at has the number 42 in it, which tells you that 6 times 7 equals 42.

 

X123456789101112
1

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

2

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

16

18

20

22

24

3

3

6

9

12

15

18

21

24

27

30

33

36

4

4

8

12

16

20

24

28

32

36

40

44

48

5

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

55

60

6

6

12

18

24

30

36

42

48

54

60

66

72

7

7

14

21

28

35

42

49

56

63

70

77

84

8

8

16

24

32

40

48

56

64

72

80

88

96

9

9

18

27

36

45

54

63

72

81

90

99

108

10

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

110

120

11

11

22

33

44

55

66

77

88

99

110

121

132

12

12

24

36

48

60

72

84

96

108

120

132

144

 

 

 

 

6th Grade Math

During 6th grade math, many math topics are introduced that build upon prior knowledge and attempt to begin building the basis for the study of pre-Algebra. Students are taught more advanced topic in Numbers, Measurement, Geometry and Operations.

Students are expected to be able to understand the idea of ratios, rates, percentages and rounding. Furthermore, 6th grade math students should be understand the relationships between fractions and decimals and should be able to understand multiples, composites and factors of numbers. Students should be proficient in understanding and recognizing numbers up to 1 million and understand place value to at least 4 places on either side of the decimal point. Students should understand basic of integers and how to recognize them.

Students need to have complete understanding of units of measurement in both the standard and metric systems and be able to use that knowledge to solve problems. Students should be able to understand cubed, squared and linear measurements. They should be able to calculate the volume of rectangular prisms and be able to do measurement problems involving triangles, circles and rectangles. 

They are expected to come to a full understanding of several important geometric relationships and properties. 6th grade math students should be able to classify triangles by side properties and angle properties. For example, they should be able to identify obtuse and acute angles and as well as scalene and isosceles triangles. Students should be able to construct angles and triangles using just a protractor. 

Students should be able to understand beginning pre-Algebra problems such as being able to find the missing values when given equations that involve one or two operations. They need to be able to create their own data graphs from collecting the data to the final presentation in graph form. They should be able to analyze and interpret data from graphs they are given or that they construct themselves to complete 6th grade math.

 

 

 

 

5th Grade Math

In 5th grade math, it is the year when some of the changes begin occurring as students begin to master the very basics of arithmetic and make the transition to higher levels of math study. This is apparent with their study in numbers, measurement, geometry, and manipulation of numbers.

Students are expected to be able to count by various numbers all the way to 144. For example, they must know how to count by 9's, 9, 18, 27, etc all the way to 144. 5th grade math students should also know the entire multiplication table from 1 to 12. Students should understand decimals to the one thousandth place and be able to understand the basics of fractions. They need to be able to multiply and divide decimals.

Students need to have complete understanding of units of measurement in both the standard and metric systems and should be able to use them in math activities. They should be able to measure items with a ruler accurately and they should be able to begin to make estimates of measurements. Furthermore, 5th grade math students should be able solve measurement problems concerning perimeter, area, and volume. They should be able to understand and explain formulas for solving these types of problems.

In 5th grade math, they should be able to understand how to classify triangles by their side properties or their angle properties. They should learn how to construct angles with a protractor as well as understand the coordinate grid on a map.

Students should be able to find the missing value when given an equation that involves a single operation. 5th grade math will teach a child to create surveys for gathering data. They need to be able to recognize the different types of graphs and be able to recognize which graph type would best represent their data.

 

 

 

 

4th Grade Math

4th grade math students are becoming more comfortable with math by this time. By the fourth grade, they have learned all of the basic operations and know how to use them. The 4th grade is a chance to consolidate and solidify that knowledge. You can see this in the topics of numbers, measurement, geometry and manipulation of numbers that they are studying. 

Students are expected to be able to count by various numbers all the way to 100. For example, 4th grade math students must know how to count by 8's, 8, 16, 24, etc. all the way to 100. Students should understand the multiplication table from 1 to 10. 4th grade math will teach your child to be able to understand decimals to the one hundredth place and be able to recognize fractions. 

Students need to have an understanding of their units of measurement such as inches, feet, miles, centimeters, meters, ounces, pounds and grams. They need to be able to measure perimeter and area for triangles and rectangles. They need to be able to measure volume and mass. They need to understand how to make change for various amounts up to $50.

A 4th grade math student should be able to make various geometric shapes using straws, popsicle sticks or even string. They need to be able to measure angles using their protractor. Finally, they need sort and identify geometric figures and shapes.

Students should be able analyze the rule of equations and find missing values in an equation. They need to be able to create and label a variety of graphs as well as read and interpret information from graphs. 4th grade math heads into algebra and geometry, so it is important that your child gets any extra help they need to understand the basics.

 

3rd Grade Math

In 3rd grade math, the study of the four basic operations, multiplication, division, additions, and subtraction, is completed. It's an important milestone for students as they are really beginning to understand the world around them in all their subjects, including math. This is seen by examining what they should learn in the four major areas of mathematics.

3rd students should be able to learn how to write and identify numbers up to 1000 and be able to add and subtract numbers from 1 to 20 mentally. They should be able to count beyond 1000 using 1's, 10's and 100's. They should be able to identify numbers up to 1000 just by sight. They should also be able to understand the multiplication tables from 1 to 7 and know how to do basic division. Finally, a 3rd grade math student should be able to subtract or add numbers with 1 to 4 digits.

Third grade students should also be able to use and understand measurements terms relating to linear distance. They should be able to read the time and measure temperature accurately. They should also be able to compare the usage of different measuring tools.

In the area of geometry, 3rd grade math students should be able to describe and make geometric objects. They should also be able to solve geometric puzzles. They should be able to describe and compare various two dimensional and three dimensional shapes.

Students should be able to recognize and record various patterns found in traffic or the weather. They should be able describe patterns they see in the world around them and come up with rules for those patterns.  Lastly, they should be able to make probability experiments using dice or coins and try to make predictions on the outcomes. 3rd grade math covers a lot, as your child's math education heads towards more complex material.

 

 

 

2nd Grade Math

During the second grade, 2nd grade math students are at transition phase. They are building on the very basic skills they have learned while taking on ever more complex math for their age. It's a pivotal year for math and success in second grade math can make later years much easier. The proportional amount of math knowledge gained during second grade is some of the most diverse they will learn until high school.

Second graders should be expected to identify and write numbers from 1 to 1000 coupled with being able to point out numbers, when requested, from 1 to 1000. They should also be able to understand that the numbers in a list are the same, no matter what order they are in. Students are introduced to the idea of division and learn how to multiply basic numbers together. They are also expected to do simple word problems that use addition and subtraction.

2nd grade math students should be be able to make simple comparisons between objects and be able to measure using spoons, cups and rules. They should be introduced to the idea of inches, feet, centimeters and meters. They should be able to compare different measurement tools.

Second graders should be able to describe shapes and as well as build using different shapes. They should be able to identify geometric shapes in the world around them. Furthermore, they should be able to make patterns when given different shapes.

2nd grade math students should be able to make very simple graphs denoting 1 or 2 different attributes. They should know how to construct a very basic bar graph. Finally, they should be able to investigate the results when you flip coins or roll dice.

 

 

 

First Grade Math

First grade math is the beginning of the journey to math understanding. So much is learned in first grade math. Students learn how study math and that in and of itself is one of the most important lessons they can learn in math. They learn how to think and find answers. It's a wonderful grade for eager math learners and the diversity of topics never ceases to excite students.

In the first grade, students will learn how to add numbers from 1 to 10 in their head. They will learn how to count to 100 and how to identify numbers from 1 to 100 by sites. They will how to recognize the different coins and use the pennies for simple addition and subtractions. They will also be introduced to the concept of 1/2 and how to use it in every day life.

Student will also learn how to use less than, more than as well as same as. They will learn how to use other comparisons words as well. They will learn how to tell basic time. They will learn about temperature difference between indoors and outdoors. They also compare objects and then learn to classify the objects. Furthermore, first grade math will teach them how to measure with everyday items like their pencil, the fingers or even a sheet of paper.

They will learn how to describe and identify simple shapes as well as describe similarities and differences in shapes. They always learn how to recognize symmetry in the shapes and the world around them.

First grade math students will learn how to identity and talk about patterns that they might find in numbers, shapes, colors and even words. They will look for the patterns in the counting charts from 1 to 100. They will even learn how to talk about these patterns. They will also create simple surveys that can be answered with a yes or no answer. Finally, they will learn how to use a graph in order to write down the number information supplied by their teacher.

 

 

 

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